RESOURCE CENTRE

Information on the CHL Drafts, the USHL & NAHL Drafts and NCAA FAQ’s

Players and Parents have a lot of questions when their player reaches the end of his Midget career. Hopefully they thought ahead of time and had an Exposure Membership so there would be opportunities waiting for him or her. Some players may be stuck in the middle of trying to decide between Major Junior or a College Scholarship. Some may just be interested in knowing what level their player could play at. The fact is it’s typically a busy time for players and parents so we have put some info together that we think might help you.

The Western Hockey League’s (WHL) 22 Member Clubs are located throughout Western Canada and the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S. Players who reside in the Western Canadian provinces of Alberta, B.C., Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Northwest Territories, Yukon, and the Western U.S. states of Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming are within the protected territory designated by the Canadian Hockey League (CHL) to the WHL. Players are eligible to be drafted or placed on the protected list of a WHL Member Club.  Top level players develop in the system through the various leagues and in the year of their 16th birthday, become eligible to play in the WHL on a full time basis.  Players can continue to play in the WHL until the year of their 20th birthday, after which their junior eligibility expires and they graduate from the Major Junior ranks.

The WHL Bantam Draft is held annually by the WHL to provide an orderly transfer of players to WHL Club Protected Player Lists (PPL). Once a player is selected by a WHL Club, he can only participate in tryout camps and other team activities for that Club. To attend the camp of another Club, the player must be dropped from his current Club’s PPL.

The WHL Bantam Draft is typically held on the first Thursday in May, at which time WHL Clubs select players who have graduated from the Bantam age category.. All players in the proper age group and WHL territory are automatically eligible for the Draft, and do not need to file any sort of paperwork with the WHL Office.

Each WHL Club is allowed to place 50 players on its Protected Player List (PPL).

The 50 Player Protected List is used by the WHL to ensure there is an orderly method for WHL Clubs to access the playing rights to players. This equal access to the talent pool allows the WHL to promote competitive balance and order in the system.

A player may not be added to a WHL Club PPL until he is eligible for the WHL Bantam Draft, which occurs following the completion of his final season in the Bantam age category.

All players on a WHL Club’s roster are required to be on the 50 Player Protected List. If a WHL Club active roster consists of 23 players, this leaves 27 spots available for future prospects. If a player on a WHL Club PPL no longer meets the expectations of the team, he may be replaced by another prospect. As a result, a List is constantly changing as teams evaluate their players and make adjustments to their PPL.

A player who is on a WHL Club’s List may not play for another WHL team, or attend another WHL Club tryout camp. However, being a member of a WHL Club 50 Player Protected List does not restrict a player from playing for, or attending a camp of a non-WHL Club. The 50 Player Protected List is used strictly to determine which WHL Club holds the player’s rights.

http://prospects.whl.ca/prospect-central-faqs/

The Ontario Hockey League’s (OHL) 20 member clubs are located throughout Ontario and the states of Michigan and Pennsylvania. Players who reside in Ontario, as well as from the U.S. states Michigan, Pennsylvania and New York, and a few other designated U.S. states east of the Mississippi River are within the protected territory designated by the Canadian Hockey League (CHL) to the OHL. Players can continue to play in the OHL until the year of their 20th birthday, after which their junior eligibility expires and they graduate from the Major Junior ranks.

The OHL Minor Midget Draft is held annually by the OHL to provide an orderly transfer of players to OHL Clubs. Once a player is selected by an OHL Club, he can only participate in tryout camps and other team activities for that Club.

The OHL Minor Midget Draft is typically held on the second Saturday in April, at which time OHL Clubs select players who have graduated from the Minor Midget age category. All players in the proper age group and OHL territory are automatically eligible for the Draft, and do not need to file any sort of paperwork with the OHL Office.

http://ontariohockeyleague.com/ohl-prospective-player-information/

The Quebec Major Junior Hockey League’s (QMJHL) 20 member clubs are located throughout Quebec and the provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. Players who reside in Quebec, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island, as well as the U.S. region of New England, which includes Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire and Rhode Island are within the protected territory designated by the Canadian Hockey League (CHL) to the QMJHL. Players can continue to play in the QMJHL until the year of their 20th birthday, after which their junior eligibility expires and they graduate from the Major Junior ranks.

The QMJHL Minor Midget Draft is held annually by the QMJHL to provide an orderly transfer of players to QMJHL Clubs. Once a player is selected by a QMJHL Club, he can only participate in tryout camps and other team activities for that Club.

The QMJHL Minor Midget Draft is typically held on the first Saturday in June, at which time QMJHL Clubs select players who have graduated from the Minor Midget age category. All players in the proper age group and QMJHL territory are automatically eligible for the Draft, and do not need to file any sort of paperwork with the QMJHL Office.

http://theqmjhl.ca/

The United States Hockey League consists of 17 teams. States represented include Michigan, Illinois, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Wisconsin and Ohio.

The USHL Draft takes place during the first week of May each year and is completed in two “Phases”.

Phase I of the Draft is ten rounds of “Futures” age players only, which are U-17 players for next year’s season. (2001 birth year players only for the 2017 Draft).

Phase II of the Draft will take place the following day beginning with round one. This draft is open to players of all ages eligible to play junior hockey and are not currently protected by another USHL team.  Teams will fill their roster to a total of 45 players on this date; this includes players that were previously on a team’s Affiliate List. The total number of players that a team will draft will vary depending on the number of Affiliate players a team may have.  All veteran roster players are automatically protected by their current team until July 10.

Teams will have their training camps/tryouts in June and July. Teams will typically have 60-80 players at their training camps. By July 10th, teams must be down to a 30-man protected and 18-man affiliate list. Undrafted players have the opportunity to go to any team’s camp and make the team as a tryout player.

Before the season starts, teams will be required to have their team rosters cut down to 23 players and teams are allowed to carry an 18-man affiliate list of players.

http://www.ushl.com/page/show/1209120-future-players

The North American Hockey League consists of 23 teams. States represented include Michigan, Illinois, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Ohio, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Alaska, Texas, Louisiana and Kansas.

 

 Do players have to pay-to-play in the NAHL?
No. As the only USA Hockey-sanctioned Tier II Junior league, players do not pay to play in the NAHL.

 What is a tender?
A tender is a contract, of sorts, a player signs announcing his intentions to play for that particular NAHL team and that NAHL team only. Once a player signs a tender with an NAHL team, his playing rights belong to that team within the NAHL and he may not be recruited by any other NAHL team. Each team is granted ten (10) tenders – plus or minus any trades – which become active on Nov. 1. Tendered players are not eligible for the NAHL draft.

How many players can a team select?
The number of selections each Club is allowed to make is based on the number of players on that Club’s pre-draft Protected List minus 30. (Example: If Club’s veteran’s + tenders = 22, 30-22 = 8, then Club has 8 picks to get its roster up to 30).

When is the NAHL draft?
The NAHL Entry Draft is scheduled for early June each year.

 Do I have to register for the NAHL draft?
No, there is no registration process to be eligible for the draft.

 Are tendered or drafted players eligible to try out for other NAHL teams?
Unless agreed upon in writing by the two NAHL teams, tendered or drafted players are not eligible to try out for other NAHL teams.

Are tendered or drafted players eligible to try out for teams in other junior leagues?
Yes, all tendered and drafted players are eligible to try out for any team in any league other than the NAHL in the U.S. and Canada.

 What if I am not drafted or tendered, but still want to play in the NAHL?
Players that go undrafted must contact the individual NAHL teams regarding tryout procedures. Un-drafted and non-tendered players are eligible to try out for any NAHL team. Many free-agent players earn roster spots in tryout camps, and therefore are a very important part of an NAHL’s recruiting process.

 How do I learn about individual teams’ tryout dates, costs and procedures?
Tryout dates and contact information will posted on nahl.com, as well as the teams’ individual Web sites, which can be accessed through nahl.com.

 How do I let teams know I am interested in playing in the NAHL?
Prospective players must contact the individual NAHL teams coaching and scouting staffs regarding their interest. Contact information can be found on the teams’ individual Web sites, which can be accessed through nahl.com.

 Are non-U.S.-born citizens allowed to play in the NAHL?
Yes, each NAHL team is allowed by USA Hockey to list up to four (4) imports (non-U.S. citizens) on its protected list (roster) at one time.

 Can high school student-athletes leave home to play in the NAHL?
Yes, many players still in high school leave home to play in the NAHL. Those players enroll in a high school in their NAHL town and are under the strict supervision of an academic advisor at the high school as well as the NAHL team’s staff.

http://nahl.com/play-in-the-nahl/nahl-recruiting-faq.cfm

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is a non-profit association which regulates athletes of 1,281 institutions, conferences, organizations, and individuals. It also organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, and helps more than 450,000 college student-athletes who compete annually in college sports. The organization is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana.

NCAA Men’s Hockey consists of three divisions, Division 1 (DI), Division 2 (DII) and Division 3 (DIII). Under NCAA rules, Division I and Division II schools can offer scholarships to athletes for playing a sport. Division III schools may not offer any athletic scholarships. Generally, larger schools compete in Division I and smaller schools in II and III.

NCAA Division I (D-I) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States. D-I schools include the major collegiate athletic powers, with larger budgets, more elaborate facilities and more athletic scholarships than Divisions II and III as well as many smaller schools committed to the highest level of intercollegiate competition.

The DI level was once called the University Division of the NCAA, in contrast to the lower level College Division; these terms were replaced with numeric divisions in 1973. The University Division was renamed Division I, while the College Division was split in two; the College Division members that offered scholarships or wanted to compete against those who did became Division II, while those who did not want to offer scholarships became Division III.[1]

Division III (D-III) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States. D-III consists of athletic programs at colleges and universities that choose not to offer athletic scholarships to their student-athletes.

The NCAA’s first split was into two divisions, the University and College Divisions, in 1956. The College Division was formed for smaller schools that did not have the resources of the major athletic programs across the country. The College Division split again in 1973 when the NCAA went to its current naming convention: Division I, Division II, and Division III. Division III schools are not allowed to offer athletic scholarships, while D-II schools can.

Division III is the NCAA’s largest division with around 450 member institutions, which are 80% private and 20% public. The median undergraduate enrollment of D-III schools is about 2,750, although the range is from 418 to over 38,000. Approximately 40% of all NCAA student-athletes compete in D-III.[1]

Website www.achahockey.org

The American Collegiate Hockey Association (ACHA) is a chartered non-profit corporation that is the national governing body of non-varsity college ice hockey in the United States. The organization provides structure, regulations, promotes the quality of play, sponsors National Awards and National Tournaments.

The ACHA currently has three men’s and two women’s divisions and includes approximately 450 teams from across the United States. Teams offer few athletic scholarships and typically receive far less university funding.[1][2]

The ACHA offers an opportunity for college hockey programs that struggle with large budgets and Title IX issues, as an alternative to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) financial structure.[3] Sometimes, NCAA and ACHA teams will compete against one another.[4]

Men’s Divisions
ACHA Men’s Division 1 comprises 57 teams. Many of these teams compete against NCAA Hockey D1 and D3 Schools throughout the regular season. There are seven conferences along with Independent teams that compete annually for the Murdoch Cup, which is awarded to the Men’s ACHA Division 1 National Champion. Twenty teams compete in the National Tournament. These top-twenty teams are ranked/selected by way of computer rankings, and as determined by auto-berths from the seven regular-season Conference champions. At Nationals, teams ranked 1–12 all receive first-round byes, with teams ranked 13–20 matching up 20 vs 13 (etc.), for the rights to play in the second-round in pre-determined bracket slots.
CONFERENCES
Central States Collegiate Hockey League (CSCHL)
College Hockey Mid-America (CHMA)
Eastern Collegiate Hockey Association (ECHA)
Eastern States Collegiate Hockey League (ESCHL)
Great Lakes Collegiate Hockey League (GLCHL)
Northeast Collegiate Hockey League (NECHL)
Western Collegiate Hockey League (WCHL)

ACHA Men’s Division 2 is currently the largest division in the ACHA, it includes approximately 200 teams in 12 conferences and Independents. These teams are divided into four Regions (Central, Northeast, Southeast and West). A total of 16 teams qualify for the National Tournament, four from each region. Each month of the season a ranking of the top 15 teams in region is released. After the final ranking in February the top two seeds from each region earn an automatic berth into Nationals. Seeds 3–10 compete in their respective single-elimination Regional Tournaments, with the two teams who win both of their games also earning a Nationals berth. The National Tournament is a pool play format with the winners of each pool advancing to the semifinals. The semifinal match-ups are the winner of Pool A vs. Pool C and Pool B vs. Pool D.

CONFERENCES
Atlantic Coast Collegiate Hockey League (ACCHL)
Colonial States College Hockey Conference (CSCHC) (The Colonial)
College Hockey Southwest (CHSW)
Great Midwest Hockey League (GMHL)
Mid-American Collegiate Hockey Association (MACHA)
Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Hockey Association (MACH)
Mountain West Collegiate Hockey League (MWCHL)
Northeast Collegiate Hockey Association (NECHA)
Northern Collegiate Hockey League (NCHL)
Pacific 8 Intercollegiate Hockey Conference (PAC-8)
Super East Collegiate Hockey League (SECHL)
Tri-State Collegiate Hockey League (TSCHL)
Western Collegiate Club Hockey Association (WCCHA)
West Coast Hockey Conference (WCHC)

ACHA Men’s Division 3 consists of approximately 140 teams in ten conferences and Independents. These teams are also divided into four Regions (Atlantic, North, Pacific and South). A total of 16 teams qualify for the National Tournament in the same manner as Division 2. The National Tournament has also been conducted in the same manner as Division 2 since 2010. Before that it was single elimination and every team played four games. The one exception is the semifinals match-ups. The winner of Pool A plays the winner of Pool B and the winner of Pool C plays the winner of Pool D.
CONFERENCES
Blue Ridge Hockey Conference (BRHC)
College Hockey East (CHE)
Delaware Valley Collegiate Hockey Conference (DVCHC)
Empire Collegiate Hockey Conference (ECHC)
Indiana Collegiate Hockey Conference (ICHC)
Metropolitan Collegiate Hockey Conference (MCHC) (Contains Non-ACHA members)
Michigan Collegiate Hockey Conference (MCHC)
Mid-American Collegiate Hockey Association (MACHA)
Pacific Collegiate Hockey Association (PCHA)
South Eastern Collegiate Hockey Conference (SECHC)
Southern Collegiate Hockey Conference (SCHC)

Women’s Divisions
ACHA Women’s Division 1 includes 23 teams for the 2016–17 season, with all but independents Liberty and McKendree playing in one of the three WD1 conferences. Eight teams qualify for the national tournament each season: automatic bids are awarded to the playoff champions of the Central Collegiate Women’s Hockey Association and the Western Women’s Collegiate Hockey League, with the remainder of the field determined by taking the highest-placing teams from the last of a series of weekly rankings (the rankings are calculated through a computer component and the consolidated opinion of the WD1 competition committee, with each weighted 50 percent). At nationals, the eight teams are paired off by ranking (1 vs. 8, 2 vs. 7, etc.) for a best-of-three first round, with the winners of those series advancing to the semifinals.
CONFERENCES
Central Collegiate Women’s Hockey Association (CCWHA)
Eastern Collegiate Women’s Hockey League (ECWHL)
Western Women’s Collegiate Hockey League (WWCHL)
ACHA Women’s Division 2 includes 41 teams for the 2016–17 season, with 27 standing as a member of one of four conferences. All teams are sorted into either the East Region (22 teams) or the West Region (19 teams). At the end of the year, the top six teams from each region in the final edition of a quarterly ranking (calculated similarly to the WD1 rankings, with an exception being that each region has its own competition committee) are invited to the ACHA National Tournament. The WD2 tournament differs from WD1 in that teams are divided into pools and play a round robin to determine the semifinalists.
CONFERENCES
East Region Conferences

College Hockey East (CHE)
Delaware Valley Collegiate Hockey Conference (DVCHC)
Independent Women’s Collegiate Hockey League (IWCHL)
West Region Conference

Central Collegiate Women’s Hockey Association (CCWHA)
Note: The CCWHA includes both a Division 1 and a Division 2 conference, with separate groups of teams as members

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